Forestry Activities

Value of production of planted forests drops in 2019 interrupting three years of growth

Section: Economic Statistics | Umberlândia Cabral | Design: Helena Pontes

October 15, 2020 10h00 AM | Last Updated: October 16, 2020 11h20 AM

  • At a glance

  • The value of silviculture production fell by 5% in 2019 and stood at R$ 15.5 billion, reducing its share to 77.7% in forest production.
  • The value of forest production decreased by 2.7%, totaling R$ 20 billion.
  • In silviculture, the value of the production of roundwood for pulp fell 11%, standing at R$ 4.5 billion, while roundwood for other purposes fell 3%, totaling another R$ 4.5 billion.
  • Among silviculture loggers, only firewood had an increase in the value of production (1.1%), rising to R$ 2.2 billion.
  • Among the products from wild-crop harvesting, there was an increase in wood products and other groups, such as food products, which grew 0.8% and totaled R$ 1.2 billion.
  • Acai berries still holds the largest share in the value of production among food products (48.3%).
  • Minas Gerais totaled R$ 4.4 billion in production value in 2019 and led the ranking of forest production in the country.
#PraCegoVer Vista frontal de uma floresta de eucalíptos. Na parte inferior da foto uma pate de mato, os eucalíptos na metade da foto e acima um céu azul com poucas nuvens
Drop in wood production explains decrease in silviculture - Photo: Licia Rubinstein

After three consecutive years of growth, the value of production of silviculture (obtained from planted forests) fell by 5% in 2019 compared to the previous year, recording R$ 15.5 billion. As a result, the participation of silviculture represented 77.7% of the value of forest production, which was R$ 20 billion, while wild-crop harvesting (in forests and native forests) accounted for 22.3%, as shown by the survey of Silviculture Activities (PEVS), released today (15) by the IBGE.

Silviculture exceeds wild-crop harvesting in terms of participation in the value of production since 2000. The decrease in silviculture led to a 2.7% drop in the total value of forest production (R$ 20 billion).

“There was a sharp drop in the value of production for both roundwood for pulp and other purposes. And these two productions have a very large weight within silviculture. Pulp, for example, is a strong export product in Brazil, it was the fourth most exported by the country. So the retraction of these two products meant that the value of silviculture production fell by 5%”, explains the survey supervisor, Rachel Pinton.

In silviculture, the value of the production of roundwood for pulp fell by 11%, standing at R$ 4.5 billion, while roundwood for other purposes had its production value reduced by 3%, also standing at R$ 4.5 billion. Among wood products from silviculture, only firewood had an increase in the value of production (1.1%), reaching R$ 2.2 billion.

Even with the 3.3% drop in the share of the total value of production, wood products from silviculture and wild-crop harvesting are still predominant in the sector, representing 90% of forest production. Among non-timber companies in silviculture, all products grew in production value in 2019. Resin grew 2.6%, generating R$ 371.7 million, while black wattle bark rose 36.4%, totaling R$ 46 million.

Among the products of wild-crop harvesting, there was an increase in wood products and other groups, such as food products, resulting in a 6.4% increase in the value of production. “The increase in the food group can be attributed to the minimum price incentive policy for products related to socio-biodiversity, as pequi and Brazil nuts, which are important in traditional communities, small farmers and settlements, and have had a very significant increase”, analyzes Ms. Pinton.

The wild-crop harvesting of non-wood products, relevant to traditional peoples and communities, grew by 2.3% in the value of production, totaling R$ 1.6 billion. The value of the production of the food group, which is the highest among non-timber producers in wild-crop harvesting, grew 0.8%, reaching R$ 1.2 billion. Among the products in this group, acai berries continued to have the greatest share in the value of production (48.3%).

Minas Gerais leads the country's forest production value

Leading the ranking of states in the value of forest production, Minas Gerais totaled R$ 4.4 billion in 2019. The state is the largest producer of charcoal in the country, accounting for 86.8% of the national volume. Although there was a 2.2% increase in the volume of production, the value of production fell by 2% in Minas Gerais.

The second place in the ranking, Paraná, had R$ 3.1 billion in production value, with a highlight to the production of roundwood for other purposes, which increased by 6.2% and reached 17.9 million cubic meters. With that, the state remains the largest producer in the country.

Mato Grosso do Sul, the largest producer of roundwood for paper and pulp, had a decrease of 16.6% in the amount produced, totaling 14.6 million cubic meters. The downturn was due to low pulp prices in 2019.

Among the municipalities, João Pinheiro (MG) led the production value in 2019, with R $ 263.7 million. The municipality's highlight was the production of eucalyptus charcoal, which had an increase of 7.4% in volume. Três Lagoas (MS), second in the ranking, stands out with the production of eucalyptus wood for paper and pulp. Even with the 11% decrease in the value of the product, the municipality totaled R$ 247.3 million in total silviculture.

Planted forest area grows 1.2% in the country

The survey points to an increase of 1.2% in the total area of ​​planted forests in the country, which represents an increase of 118.1 thousand hectares. Approximately 79,400 hectares of this total correspond to areas of eucalyptus, a predominant species in the Brazilian territory. Eucalyptus and pine, combined, account for 96.1% of the areas cultivated with forests planted for commercial purposes.

Among the major regions, the Southeast surpassed the South, totaling 35.3% of the country's planted forest area. The survey indicates a trend towards the expansion of silviculture area in the Southeast. In 2019, the difference between the two regions was of 56,900 hectares.